Galileo’s Telescope

400 years later

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Product Description

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Galileo's Telescope

400 years later

350,- 

  

Inspired by the telescope built by Galileo in 1609, this contemporary instrument copies the original form, focal length (1 meter) and construction material. Modern optical technologies make this telescope perfect for quality astronomical observation.

Galileo’s Telescope permits observing the moon, the major planets, and other celestial bodies scattered through the solar system, and is also a powerful earthbound spyglass.

A novel, original object that bridges past and present; a contemporary reinterpretation of timeless form and function.

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Technical
Specifications

Material
Optical glass / abs / metal tube / beech wood / oak wood

Objective lens
Ø 60 mm

Focal length
1000 mm

Magnifications
67x, 80x, 100x with three eyepieces as standard equipment

Awards

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Designer

Odo Fioravanti

Galileo’s Telescope is inspired by the instrument with which Galileo started his observations of the Heavens in 1609. It was created to celebrate the 400th anniversary of this event and according to our wish to produce a contemporary telescope that also pays homage to the simplicity and sheer beauty of the original instrument.

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That is exactly what he says — “I must” — because he hates waste and believes it is wrong to waste the great quantity of stars that is put at his disposal.

Italo Calvino

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When is a beautiful starry night Mr. Palomar says: “I must go and look at the stars.”

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The night flowed into the Florentine window that framed the burning stars. The enraptured gaze questioned the Moon. It was 1609, but the highest moments of human experience are beyond the measuring of time.

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Additional Information

Weight5.0 kg
Dimensions45.0 x 30.0 x 10.0 cm